archive - issue 8

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  • /

    By MJ Turpin
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  • Apartment / Containers

    By Vincent Bezuidenhout
    These diptychs are the start of a series of images I have been working on regarding the visual landscape we choose to surround ourselves
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  • Collage

    By Claudio Parentela
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  • Drag and Snap

    By Leigh-Anne Niehaus
    This series is inspired by the childhood game of "snapdragon", which allows for simplistic and delightful decision-making through random selections of colour and number.
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  • Human/Nature

    By Lydia Anne McCarthy
    This series explores moments between nature and human beings that are at once idealistic and unsettling. Each picture is an independent narrative, but placed
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  • p u n c t u a t i o n

    By Ula Einstein
    Einstein works with a diverse range of media, including drawings and installation with fire, thread, and blades. The series of drawings and installations with
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  • Pretty Babies

    By Peregrine Honig
    With the premise that "/ " presents what is IN and what is OUT, the "Pretty Babies" series explores the fashion industry's well-published and syndicated DOs
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  • River Bank

    By Mario Sughi
    The symbol / is intended initially as a symbol of division. A real or unreal line divides the girl from the water, the girl from
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  • Seasaw

    By Sol Kjøk
    Here, the motif is conceived of as a seesaw (the typo in the title is intended, as this drawing is part of a series
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  • Series Seven Up

    By Noel Fignier
    Text by João Branco Kyron, HipnóticaThe collision is imminent and in the fraction of time left, the eyes shut and the vision is superbly
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  • A battle over samoosas between the snobbish Cinderella and a homeless electrician is mediated by Cinderella's boyfriend JJ. The samoosa battle is conflated with
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  • Untitled

    By Wilhelm Saayman
    This series of images, made using pen and ink, photographs and Photoshop, explore alternate/dream realities.
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  • Let's go there

    By Leigh Le Roux
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  • The space between.

    By Mehita Iqani
    It's a handy little line, the one that we use to make our options known. Either/Or. Paper and ink or binary code? Its clichéd,
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  • /

    By Ruth Barker
    On the QWERTY layout of my computer keyboard, the symbol / appears beside the questioning symbol ?. They are represented together on the same key, and
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  • I returned home after my first year in college to discover my younger sister had turned gorgeous. This was a disappointment, but not an
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  • Forward! Slash!

    By Travis Lyle
    You think you're a forward-thinking kinda person, do you? Lemme be the one to break it to you, sunshine – you're as lame as the
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  • Letter to the Editor

    By Elan Gamaker
    Dear Sir/Madam I should like strenuously to object to the subject matter ("/") of your current issue. It must first be mentioned, however, that it
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  • Butterfly

    By Adriana de Barros
    The pupa, a silk wrap of emotionsIsolated, within breathing, wanting to bethe intense pronoun of selfIt is silly to be one's own pronounShe giggles
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  • Evidence of Life

    By Tamlyn Martin
    Below is an extract from a series of 11 poems created in parallel with visual artworks. 5. Memories laced with visceral realityFlooding herThe gentle
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  • Immigrants

    By Stanley Onjezani Kenani
    you want to livenothing else.you leaveto liveyou swimor like fresh sardinesyou are packedin boatsyou leaveto live.  you leavegold in the belly of Africaoil in
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  • In Between

    By Tania van Schalkwyk
    Raised in an Arabian land of heat, fire and temper,sometimes the calm of England clamps downlike damp in a bathroom with no windowand a
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  • Or: a line drawing

    By Gabeba Baderoon
    Pencil and nothing. Her face turned almost entirely away. Forehead, cheekbone,jaw,the bun low in her neck,shoulderand down,the long linejust enoughthen left alone.
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  • Scissor

    By Charlotte Gait
    There was a time when you and I were connected by iron, acid, vitamin and blood. Where every mouthful I took was with the
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  • Un Hombre Fuerte

    By Tamo Vonarim
    Sun.star.kid: Written these words are, at times of a subconscious flow – whether they are mine, I don't know. All I know is that I
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  • Unbroken Awareness

    By TENDAI MWANAKA
    My life is now a floating shellI am a vessel on that river.The storm, the ship, the sea,Whose shores we lost in crossing.  I
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  • Untitled

    By Aryan Kaganof
    /At R550 rand I thought I'd rather die/ My mother: can I trust this woman?/ I thought the Romans were coming, dinkum/ …and always
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  • PATCH

    By Sean Hampton-Cole
    Keys. John speaking. 'Lo?Good morning. May I speak to Bob Mitchell please?Bob in Bonds?I'm not really sure. I'm trying to...You want extension 125. This
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  • Wayne Porter, freelance journalist, donned his anthropologist's birthday suit and hit the bowling alley. Bar the bowlers hat tipped gently off centre, the man
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  • The Incised Wound

    By Joanne Hichens
    "Please, for me, Dave," I placed my hand on his, and really, no begging, just asked him nicely, "Lay off the booze tonight." Whether
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  • He had been driving for hours through that unstable, somnambulist night when he fell asleep at the wheel. He awoke with a start and
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NON-FICTION

Sunday, 13 September 2009 02:00

Exhibit A

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In her debut novel Pompidou Posse, Sarah Lotz told the moving story of a friendship between two young women, trying to find their place in the world while negotiating the many dangers of life in the streets of Paris in the 1980s. Her second offering is a gripping crime novel entitled Exhibit A which also places an unusual friendship at its centre. This time it is the alliance between lawyer Georgie Allen and advocate Patrick McLennan, who take up the defence in a tricky rape case. They are accompanied by Exhibit A of the title, a homeless dog best at…
Yusuf Manjoo's debut book The Flight of the Wooden Dancer is an experimental novel about the nature of art and reality as well as the place of the artist within the ever evolving constellations between the two realms. Accordingly, the novel alternates between a world of fantasy and a more realistic setting in Vienna where several artists from around the world meet to work on various projects. The narrator is a Capetonian of Indian descent, researching a book inspired by a lost ballet score. In Vienna, he encounters and becomes friends with Januska, a Polish ballet dancer, and her husband…
Sunday, 13 September 2009 02:00

PopCo

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A Sunday Independent review for PopCo boldly states that 'this book might just change your life'. It's a big assertion, but then author Scarlett Thomas certainly wasn't thinking small when she wrote this story. And, while I'm not sure that my life has been dramatically transformed since reading it, it made me think long and hard about a number of facets of our culture and society I've previously not questioned.The storyline itself is not the book's strong point: in fact, as plots go, it's rather unimpressive. Alice Butler works for the eponymous PopCo, a major global toy brand. Her skills…
Sunday, 13 September 2009 02:00

Little Ice Cream Boy

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The first time we're introduced to Gideon Goosen, he's a winsomely smiling little one at play on the beach, with a clever ploy of beguiling holidaying families into buying him ice cream – hence his mother's pet name for him, "Little Ice Cream Boy". It's nigh on impossible to imagine such a mischievous imp evolving into a heartless killer steeped in the lore of violence, drugs and prostitutes, but it's this evolution that makes Little Ice Cream Boy such a captivating read. This – and the fact that it is so firmly rooted in a South Africa that many of…
Sunday, 13 September 2009 02:00

Guerilla Art

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Guerilla Art, edited by Sebastian Peiter, is a coffee-table style, hardcover art book that contains a compilation of profiles and interviews with some of the world's best-known street artists. These include British Banksy (of course!), Brazilian twins os gémeos, New York graffiti crew, Barnstormers, and Parisians Space Invader and Blek Le Rat, as well as a number of up and coming artists who are constantly redefining the scene. The hardcover, image-strong format of the book suits its purpose – to profile influential street artists and record a snapshot of their signature style and key works. Fans of typography might enjoy…
Sunday, 13 September 2009 02:00

The Book of the Dead

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People will be talking about The Book of the Dead for a long time to come. Its author, Kgebetli Moele, received positive critical acclaim for and won a few prizes with his debut novel Room 207. His second novel is a daring undertaking for which he also deserves to be highly commended. The Book of the Dead must have taken a lot of guts to write, and it will take even more guts to hear what Moele has to say. Especially in the first part, narrated in the third person, the book often has the quality of a parable, at…
Many lovers of world poetry will be familiar with the work of one of Poland's greatest poets, Zbigniew Herbert. His name will be mentioned in one breath with other Polish greats of the twentieth century, such as the Nobel Prize recipients, Czesław Miłosz and Wisława Szymborska. I first encountered Herbert's poetry at university and immediately became one of his fans. As I share a mother tongue with the poet, I had the privilege of meeting him on his own turf, not in translation (even though I was studying in Austria at the time). That day, about twelve years ago, I…
Sunday, 13 September 2009 02:00

Fuse

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After the success of her debut youth novel, The Goblet Club, the young South African writer S.A. Partridge returns with Fuse, another exciting exponent of the genre. It tells the story of Justin Mullins and his adoptive brother, Kendall. While Justin is popular at school, knows how to stand up for himself, and has much going for him, Kendall is shy, introverted, and simply 'different'. Worst of all, Kendall is cruelly bullied by his peers who do not tolerate too much individuality. He stands out because of his long hair, dark clothes, piercings, and preference for heavy-metal music. We know…
Sunday, 13 September 2009 02:00

Elephant in the Room

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Maya Fowler's debut novel Elephant in the Room tells the story of Lily Fields and her family from the time Lily is a little girl trying to grasp her mother's relief at her father's death in an accident to the time she is a young adult suffering from a disastrous eating disorder. Set in the Western Cape, the story unfolds between many silences. Lily and her two sisters, Beth and the Gracie, grow up with their mother in Cape Town with occasional visits to their maternal grandparent's farm. After a fire destroys the house they live in, they have to…
Sunday, 13 September 2009 02:00

Invitation to ...

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'A silver, prematurely rusting mini-van, races through the quiet, manicured, tree lined suburban streets. A neighbourhood, where hubris is the motivator for a pristine exterior, like pride in an automobile demonstrated by zealous consideration to its exterior detailing, a compulsion to clean and wax constantly, decorating through accessorizing: under lit, jacked up, vibrating sub-woofers and so on. But in the car pristine, calm and tranquil is all that it isn't. A couple in their mid to late 40s are arguing. The discussion has traveled from a simple disagreement to a full-blown battle. The level of aggravation is escalating, with Paul…
Load Shedding is one of the most compelling books I've read this year. I enjoyed it so much that I went back for its predecessor, At Risk. Both are collections of essays by academics, writers and journalists at the Wits Institute for Social and Economic Research (WISER) in Johannesburg. According to the 2007 WISER Project document, "[o]ne of the distinguishing features of  [our] approach is … a strong emphasis on the practice of everyday life", and this is an underlying theme in these bold collections: academic reflection on everyday experiences expressed in a new and different form of writing.My first…
Monday, 16 March 2009 02:00

Tell Freedom

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Literature and society cannot be divorced from each other; society influences literary works which in turn reflect, refract and more often than not, try to correct the vices in society. Literary works that are rooted in apartheid South African society usually reflect the socio-political realities present there; Peter Abrahams' 1954 memoirs Tell Freedom is no different.This is not just an ordinary book; it is in a way the autobiography of the writer, a kind of memoir that casts deep glances at the effects of social fascism on his life. It tells the story of his life from childhood to adulthood-from…
Monday, 16 March 2009 02:00

No Time for Pie

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'The effort of answering broke the rhythm of his rocking – for a moment he was silent. Then the same half-knowing, half-bewildered look came back into his faded eyes.'F.Scott Fitzgerald's timeless classic 'The Great Gatsby' is as penetrative an insight into the often transparent and inflated perception of 'making it big' as can be found in the richest of book merchant's shelves. The book was an anatomy and breaking down of one of the most famous sugar coated ideologies from the West - 'the American Dream'. The more the reader reads into Fitzgerald's lead character Gatsby the more they learn…
Monday, 16 March 2009 02:00

More!

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The Trans-Cantabria first runs through, then alongside the Picos de Europa en route to Leon. It is a landscape so beautiful as to warrant cliché, and forgivably so. At Leon, the conduttore makes a fuss about sitting in the allocated space. Not that the passengers pay any attention to seating arrangements, which they treat with characteristic scorn. Lovely people, the Spanish. Proud. The Asturian scenery is very picturesque – green and lush, it is a mountainous landscape that is a series of serrated granite peaks. Unquera… Llanes… Ribadesella, it's all beautiful. Down to the ancient-looking small wooden houses, which have…
Lucidly written and well-researched, Love in the Time of Treason: The Life Story of Ayesha Dawood, is an important contribution to the vast pool of South African life-writing. In this remarkable biography, Zubeida Jaffer tells the moving life story of Ayesha Dawood and her family from the time Dawood actively entered the anti-apartheid struggle to the moment of her return from forced exile in India. A story of romantic love and political upheaval, it has followed Jaffer for almost three decades, surfacing in articles and interviews, until she sat down to write this book. Love in the Time of Treason…
Monday, 16 March 2009 02:00

Moxyland

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It takes some getting used to, but if one wants to venture into the realm of ebooks, the electronic version of Lauren Beukes' Moxyland is an exciting take-off point. I'd first read Moxyland in its original paper book form (published by Jacana in early 2008) and thought I would browse through the Electric Book Works ebook edition just to get the feel of the e-experience, but instead I ended up rereading almost the entire book.Don't get me wrong, it will take more than that to convert me to the new publishing trend, but the Moxyland ebook certainly made me more…
Monday, 16 March 2009 02:00

White Tiger

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"Meet Balram Halwai, the 'white tiger': servant, philosopher, entrepreneur, murderer". So reads the back cover of The White Tiger by Aravind Adiga, winner of 2008's Man Booker Prize – and as introductions go, it's rather intriguing.It also sets the tone for the rest of the novel: humorous in a manner that's subtle and sly, like a master at sleight of hand making a sham at being guileless. Narrator Balram Halwai, the eponymous White Tiger, gets away with it, precisely because of his craftiness and cunning.Halwai is born in a dire Indian slum; a town where poverty's stranglehold has squeezed the…
Tuesday, 10 March 2009 02:00

Beauty's Gift

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Sindiwe Magona's new book is first of all a novel, but will most probably remain in the history of South African literature as one of the most important manifestos of black feminism. 174 fast-paced pages, subdivided into short chapters; a book one can easily read in a few hours. Certainly not an easy book to review as it does not leave much space to interpretation games. It is a text consciously meant to mobilize, the message being clear and urgent. Protagonists of the story are the so called Five Firm Friends (in the book abbreviated FFF): Beauty, Amanda, Edith, Doris,…
Thursday, 05 March 2009 02:00

Saving the Alphabet

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    "Saving The Alphabet" (2005/2008) is a digital story for the web which is created in Flash and uses text, images, and audio.  The work is a commentary on the use of language in a digital age.  It addresses governmental and corporate threats to the free use of language, as language is simultaneous constructed and deconstructed by Orwellian double-speak, trademark claims, and invented etymologies on the web.The piece uses actionscript code to decay language events as they are  triggered by users. This decay is gradual and erases elements of the story after they appear. "Saving The Alphabet" is also…
I first encountered Elleke Boehmer's work on an island. While sunbathing next to a hotel pool in Sardinia in 2004, I read her novel Bloodlines (2000). Attracted by its unusual cover, I had bought the book a few months earlier in Franschhoek. I was doing research for my PhD thesis at the time, always on the lookout for new South African titles. In an uncanny way, my experience of buying (in South Africa) and reading (in Sardinia) this particular novel sheds light on its author: Elleke Boehmer is a woman of many worlds. Not surprisingly, coming from a migratory, multicultural…
The subtitle of this 1908 classic by G.K. Chesterton gives away too much, which is why the publishers – both Chesterton's original publishers and Atlantic Books, in this revamped Crime Classics edition – left it off the cover. However, the author himself, in responding to the storm of questions his book triggered, rather plaintively said that all was explained by his subtitle – A Nightmare.Classic or not, this was my first reading of The Man Who Was Thursday. I specialised in Victorian literature at university, but Queen Victoria reigned for almost 60 years, and saw many writers and schools of…
Thursday, 05 March 2009 02:00

There Was this Goat

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In the early morning of 3 March 1986, seven young black activists were shot in Gugulethu (in the Western Cape) by the apartheid security forces. This incident will remain known in South African history as the Gugulethu Seven Killings. Following the testimonies at the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, this event was further explored in two important documentaries: The Gugulethu Seven by Lindy Wilson and A Long Night's Journey into Day by Frances Reid and Deborah Hofmann.Antjie Krog, who was reporting as a journalist at the time of the TRC, remained particularly struck by the testimony of one of the mothers…
Wednesday, 01 October 2008 02:00

Out of the Wreckage

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The back of Allan Kolski Horwitz's Out of the Wreckage reads thus: "The dream and the dream situation; the dream-like; the waking fantasy; the reverie; the parable that instructs; the story that informs; the story that becomes a slip of the mind…"It's clear that this isn't straightforward reading; even for prose. But playing with words is Horwitz's specialty – his oeuvre spans poetry, plays as well as prose, and it's clear he enjoys having fun with them, using words to cast spells and weave moments, in a way that's very much beyond the obvious.Reading Out of the Wreckage does indeed…
Wednesday, 01 October 2008 02:00

100 Papers

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Let me be upfront: prose poetry isn't my favourite read. Although I certainly appreciate the skill required to craft an intense, often lyrical, piece of prose that tells an entire story, or conveys a certain mood, with limited words, I far prefer meatier novels with characters one can befriend and a storyline that gets you thinking. The problem with prose poetry, to my mind anyway, is that it's over too quickly for any of that. Plus I'm often left with a niggling feeling that there's something I just didn't get (although, admittedly, that's my problem rather than the author's).So, when…
In a time of uncertainty and discouragement, reading Mamphela Ramphele's Laying Ghosts to Rest: Dilemmas of the Transformation in South Africa feels like a breath of fresh air. Not because she is saying anything radically new, but because her honest and comprehensive assessment of present-day South Africa and the challenges the country is facing at this volatile moment in history is an inspiration to stop complaining and to start acting instead. Ramphele divides her book into six main parts, each structured around major dilemmas which the young democracy is confronted with at the moment: the historical and political heritage, questions…
By winning the Sunday Times Alan Paton Award twice for his first two books, Midlands (2002) and The Number (2004), Jonny Steinberg has become one of the best-known non-fiction writers in South Africa. This success was followed by Notes from a Fractured Country (2007), a selection of some of the best columns he wrote as a journalist for Business Day. In 2008, Steinberg has published two new titles: Three-Letter Plague: A Young Man's Journey through a Great Epidemic in the beginning of the year, and most recently Thin Blue. The Jonny Steinberg brand stands for insight, integrity and empathy. These…
Wednesday, 01 October 2008 02:00

Galgut's Take on Adam's Fall

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Damon Galgut's new novel, The Impostor, set in post-apartheid South Africa has as its protagonist a white middle-aged man called Adam Napier (the biblical reference is not fortuitous), who unexpectedly must reinvent his life from scratch, after losing his job (because of racial quotas) and consequently his apartment. He decides to move from Johannesburg to Cape Town where he thinks he can rely on his brother Gavin for help. But Gavin is a much more pragmatic, down-to-earth character who leads a rather undisturbed but successful life, buying run-down houses, renovating them cheaply and re-selling them at a much higher price.…
Wednesday, 01 October 2008 02:00

On Games, Art and Shades of Gray

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I enjoy a good game. The roll of the dice, the shuffle of cards, and the movement of pieces around a board fascinate me. My interest encompasses everything from traditional parlor games to modern digital marvels. From checkers to chess, Super Mario Bros. to Alien Hominid. Games let me take chances, outwit opponents, and conquer worlds. You can relate. We all enjoy a good game. But I am still trying to figure out what makes a game good. I think that I know part of the answer: good games capture some aspect of life. They are microcosms that isolate, imitate,…
  Take one short story writer and teacher of creative writing and show him Dubai. Send him on assignment for GQ magazine, send him on a ubiquitous press trip, and the result is George Saunders' wonderful piece: "The New Mecca". Published in the 2006 issue of The Best American Travel Writing Series, the volume edited by travel writer Tim Cahill, this piece alone makes the price of the book worthwhile and is just one of the reasons I love this series. I discovered this series way back in the 1990s when a branch of Exclusive Books stocked two Best American…
Wednesday, 01 October 2008 02:00

Footnotes in Yiddish

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          In Lithuanian cities, old timber houses sit between grey Soviet architecture and international style office blocks. Heritage laws protect these timber houses; they cannot be destroyed, but some of them are converted into take-away pizza joints and hairdressers. This is a place where you are continually slipping in and out of history; continually being reminded of something only for its meaning to crawl away and hide under something else. Illumination sometimes grabs you and then flits away too cunningly for you to grasp it, too swiftly for the tear forming in the corner of your…
Wednesday, 01 October 2008 02:00

Ode to *

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He sits quietly on the top row, hovering above 8 like a bad hangover.  * is the nice guy of the keyboard, and his uses are often overlooked.  Think of all the nasty little words that are made acceptable by his presence.  You can take a bunch of really rough, crude characters and make them fairly tame – simply by putting * with them.  "Crap", for example, is awful and smelly.  But bring in our friend and you get "cr*p" – a far more pleasant substance.  Stepping on cr*p isn't nearly as bad as stepping on crap. * can be…
Tuesday, 30 September 2008 02:00

Blood Kin

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I'm a bit perverse when it comes to books and hype: the more vaunted the read, the more determined I am to approach it with scepticism. That's the reason I am one of the only people I know who didn't enjoy the much-loved Life of Pi a few years ago.It's also the reason I was curious about Blood Kin by Ceridwen Dovey. Not only is Dovey extremely young (still in her twenties), this is also her first book. Throw in the fact that it's been nominated for – and won – two of South Africa's most prestigious literary prizes, including…
Tuesday, 30 September 2008 02:00

Sinclair

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This book is described as being based on the life of Marc Steinberg, creator of Creative Consciousness International, located in Cape Town. However,  I had to ask why the name change was necessary. Sinclair reads instead like a straight-forward recounting of facts and experiences, taken from Steinberg's life, and with the names being so similar – Sinclair, Steinberg – why not just call it a spade a spade? Sinclair opens with the narrator of the title addressing an imagined character named Benn. He first appears to Sinclair as a child, serving as an alter ego/higher self manifestation. Benn has the…
Tuesday, 30 September 2008 02:00

Double Cross

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I am not particularly passionate about crime fiction, but reading Tracy Gilpin's debut novel Double Cross was a wonderful experience. It not only has all the ingredients one expects of the genre but also a few extras which make it an especially rewarding read. Fast-paced, suspenseful, full of intrigues, and led by a fascinating heroine attempting to solve a mysterious murder, Double Cross is a true page-turner, written in a prose full of wit and a keen awareness of place. It is also a novel which should intrigue environmentalists and gender activists as it unobtrusively interweaves concerns of interest to…
Tuesday, 30 September 2008 02:00

Pompidou Posse

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Sarah Lotz's debut novel Pompidou Posse tells the story of Vicki and Sage, two young women from England, who in the late 1980s decide to flee the country after setting fire to their art school. They come to Paris, hoping to find work as au pairs and, like so many budding artists before them, to pursue a vague artistic dream. But the odd job is hard to keep, money even harder to come by, and eventually the two vagabonds end up homeless and broke on the streets of the City of Love which turns out to be anything but romantic.…
Tuesday, 30 September 2008 02:00

Beauty's Gift

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When Njabulo S. Ndebele's The Cry of Winnie Mandela was published in 2003, Antjie Krog endorsed it by saying: "For so many decades South Africans have been thirsting for this text. I feel privileged to be of the country where it has originated." This is precisely how I feel about Sindiwe Magona's latest novel, Beauty's Gift. Every one of its brave pages quenches a thirst caused by silence and denial. Ndebele wrote about black women waiting for their men to return home during the apartheid era, whether from work, exile or prison. By thematising the agonising situation of South African…
When Alex Smith, a "tea, travel and writing" addict, is told that the greatest novel ever written, Romance of the Three Kingdoms, came from China, she becomes obsessed with the country. She remembers her first encounter with China in her Grandma Connie's blue Chinese lounge rug and her brown Willow Pattern teacups. Not surprisingly then, years later, it is Grandma Connie who comes to her in a dream, telling her that she has never been to China herself, but would have loved to travel there and find the illusive pearl of the mythical Chinese dragon. In the dream, she invites…
Sunday, 25 May 2008 02:00

Letter to the Editor

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Dear Sir/Madam I should like strenuously to object to the subject matter ("/") of your current issue. It must first be mentioned, however, that it has never been the stated policy of my organisation to attempt to block or even hope to demur against publications who from time to time employ the use of certain punctuation marks above others. At the recent joint sitting of our Chamber of Deputies, however, the decision to take action against your publication was carried at 43 votes to six. A large part of the reason for this overwhelming majority was not just the belief…
Sunday, 25 May 2008 02:00

Attractiveness: The Up and Up

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I returned home after my first year in college to discover my younger sister had turned gorgeous. This was a disappointment, but not an unexpected one. My mother's tennis legs legacy was sure to flourish in one of her two girls. And as I grew pasty in my college's library the cruel nature of disproportionate genes became obvious. Still, I held on to an unlikely hope that my own raucously fun and sassy instincts were latent—waiting to explode out of my spine like shingles: Yeah, Park, you passed out under a lamppost after leading the party in a group sing-a-long…
Sunday, 25 May 2008 02:00

/

By
On the QWERTY layout of my computer keyboard, the symbol / appears beside the questioning symbol ?. They are represented together on the same key, and I can choose between them by pressing shift. / is the standard function, with ? being the shift-induced alternative. This could be represented as //? although that's slightly confusing. Perhaps if x represents / and y represents ? then we could illustrate the relationship on the key as x/y. This would indicate that the single key allows a choice of x or y (/ or ?) but that both could not be used simultaneously.…
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