archive - issue 11

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  • Apartment / Containers

    By Vincent Bezuidenhout
    These diptychs are the start of a series of images I have been working on regarding the visual landscape we choose to surround ourselves
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  • Collage

    By Claudio Parentela
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  • Drag and Snap

    By Leigh-Anne Niehaus
    This series is inspired by the childhood game of "snapdragon", which allows for simplistic and delightful decision-making through random selections of colour and number.
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  • Human/Nature

    By Lydia Anne McCarthy
    This series explores moments between nature and human beings that are at once idealistic and unsettling. Each picture is an independent narrative, but placed
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  • p u n c t u a t i o n

    By Ula Einstein
    Einstein works with a diverse range of media, including drawings and installation with fire, thread, and blades. The series of drawings and installations with
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  • Pretty Babies

    By Peregrine Honig
    With the premise that "/ " presents what is IN and what is OUT, the "Pretty Babies" series explores the fashion industry's well-published and syndicated DOs
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  • River Bank

    By Mario Sughi
    The symbol / is intended initially as a symbol of division. A real or unreal line divides the girl from the water, the girl from
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  • Seasaw

    By Sol Kjøk
    Here, the motif is conceived of as a seesaw (the typo in the title is intended, as this drawing is part of a series
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  • Series Seven Up

    By Noel Fignier
    Text by João Branco Kyron, HipnóticaThe collision is imminent and in the fraction of time left, the eyes shut and the vision is superbly
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  • A battle over samoosas between the snobbish Cinderella and a homeless electrician is mediated by Cinderella's boyfriend JJ. The samoosa battle is conflated with
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  • Untitled

    By Wilhelm Saayman
    This series of images, made using pen and ink, photographs and Photoshop, explore alternate/dream realities.
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  • The space between.

    By Mehita Iqani
    It's a handy little line, the one that we use to make our options known. Either/Or. Paper and ink or binary code? Its clichéd,
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  • /

    By Ruth Barker
    On the QWERTY layout of my computer keyboard, the symbol / appears beside the questioning symbol ?. They are represented together on the same key, and
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  • I returned home after my first year in college to discover my younger sister had turned gorgeous. This was a disappointment, but not an
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  • Forward! Slash!

    By Travis Lyle
    You think you're a forward-thinking kinda person, do you? Lemme be the one to break it to you, sunshine – you're as lame as the
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  • Letter to the Editor

    By Elan Gamaker
    Dear Sir/Madam I should like strenuously to object to the subject matter ("/") of your current issue. It must first be mentioned, however, that it
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  • Butterfly

    By Adriana de Barros
    The pupa, a silk wrap of emotionsIsolated, within breathing, wanting to bethe intense pronoun of selfIt is silly to be one's own pronounShe giggles
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  • Evidence of Life

    By Tamlyn Martin
    Below is an extract from a series of 11 poems created in parallel with visual artworks. 5. Memories laced with visceral realityFlooding herThe gentle
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  • Immigrants

    By Stanley Onjezani Kenani
    you want to livenothing else.you leaveto liveyou swimor like fresh sardinesyou are packedin boatsyou leaveto live.  you leavegold in the belly of Africaoil in
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  • In Between

    By Tania van Schalkwyk
    Raised in an Arabian land of heat, fire and temper,sometimes the calm of England clamps downlike damp in a bathroom with no windowand a
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  • Or: a line drawing

    By Gabeba Baderoon
    Pencil and nothing. Her face turned almost entirely away. Forehead, cheekbone,jaw,the bun low in her neck,shoulderand down,the long linejust enoughthen left alone.
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  • Scissor

    By Charlotte Gait
    There was a time when you and I were connected by iron, acid, vitamin and blood. Where every mouthful I took was with the
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  • Un Hombre Fuerte

    By Tamo Vonarim
    Sun.star.kid: Written these words are, at times of a subconscious flow – whether they are mine, I don't know. All I know is that I
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  • Unbroken Awareness

    By TENDAI MWANAKA
    My life is now a floating shellI am a vessel on that river.The storm, the ship, the sea,Whose shores we lost in crossing.  I
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  • Untitled

    By Aryan Kaganof
    /At R550 rand I thought I'd rather die/ My mother: can I trust this woman?/ I thought the Romans were coming, dinkum/ …and always
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  • PATCH

    By Sean Hampton-Cole
    Keys. John speaking. 'Lo?Good morning. May I speak to Bob Mitchell please?Bob in Bonds?I'm not really sure. I'm trying to...You want extension 125. This
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  • Wayne Porter, freelance journalist, donned his anthropologist's birthday suit and hit the bowling alley. Bar the bowlers hat tipped gently off centre, the man
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  • The Incised Wound

    By Joanne Hichens
    "Please, for me, Dave," I placed my hand on his, and really, no begging, just asked him nicely, "Lay off the booze tonight." Whether
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  • He had been driving for hours through that unstable, somnambulist night when he fell asleep at the wheel. He awoke with a start and
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NON-FICTION

Saturday, 03 September 2011 02:00

Feeding Off Glints

By
      Who knows how long it went unnoticed, a now negative space within one of hundreds of Hollywood vaults. Before it vanished, according to all documented history pertaining to the subject, one can only imagine how those faintly pink scales still shimmered pearlescent when caught in the light of some night shift security guard's torch. Nevertheless, it's all too understandable why these glints, taken off a slightly uncovered section of paw or protruding mass of animatronic tail, have over the years lost attention. In the beginning there were two different models of the Luck Dragon, which became better…
Monday, 21 March 2011 02:00

Dividing by Zero

By
This article is incomplete and may require expansion or cleanup. The infinite monkey theorem states that a monkey hitting keys at random on a typewriter keyboard for an infinite amount of time will almost surely type a given text, such as the complete works of William Shakespeare.In his will, Shakespeare left the bulk of his large estate to his elder daughter Susanna. The terms instructed that she pass it down intact to "the first son of her body". The Quineys had three children, all of whom died without marrying. The Halls had one child, Elizabeth, who married twice but died…
  This is my heavily-scarred A3 calendar for 2010. Much like a barcode it contains hidden information, blips and beeps worth reviewing, snippets of wisdom even. I've selected those that weren't past their sell-by date. 15 January - Learned that, even at the age of 45, it's possible to meet new people and experience the near-audible click that marks the connection between two kindred spirits. 18 January - Was reminded that one should always trust one's gut feeling when it comes to cats and other pets. I knew I was going to get screwed, but I took the plunge anyway.…
Monday, 21 March 2011 02:00

Wall of Days

By
I have approached this review with some trepidation, not least because of the debate about South African reading, writing and critical practices that continues to dominate both literary online chat forums and the books pages of major local newspapers. Indeed, it occurs to me that - even though I have presumed to weigh in on the discussion - it has been many months since I last wrote a straightforward "book review". Caveat scriptor! Then again, I suppose this is not going to be a run-of-the-mill review. The other reason I've been apprehensive is that Alastair Bruce's debut novel Wall of…
Monday, 21 March 2011 02:00

All Men Are Liars

By
Alberto Manguel's latest novel to be translated into English, All Men Are Liars, is one of those works of fiction which elicits complete contentment in the reader and the wish to share it with everybody one knows. Until now, I have only been acquainted with Manguel's non-fiction - especially one of my all-time favourites, and an absolute must for any bibliophile, A History of Reading - and I have been a bit apprehensive about approaching one of his works of fiction, but All Men Are Liars also bowled me over. A novel of true spark, wisdom and beauty, All Men…
"Well it isn't every day that an elephant appears in our lives." For José Saramago that particular day he was giving a guest lecture at the University of Salzburg and, in the evening, having dinner at 'The Elephant', a restaurant in the centre of the famous city of Mozart. Inside the restaurant he observed a series of carvings which clearly represented an itinerary of a journey through Europe. He inquired about them. The story of the carvings inspired The Elephant's Journey, Saramago's penultimate novel, recently published by Harvill Secker in English translation. For a while now José Saramago has been…
Monday, 21 March 2011 02:00

Consuming ideas

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 US-based barcode artist Scott Blake talks to Karen Martin about the universal language of his work.  "I consider myself a citizen of the world, and do not recognize lines drawn in the sand that divide humanity. We are part of a larger system that extends as far as my imagination can go." Karen Martin: Barcodes were first used to label railroad cars in the early 1960s, but only became common when they began to be used to automate supermarket check out systems in the mid-1970s. How have barcodes changed since then, in what they're used for and in what they've…
Sunday, 07 November 2010 02:00

Just Dessert, Dear

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Renowned South African author Marita Van der Vyver offers up a bittersweet and entertaining novel to the table of women's literature. Just Dessert, Dear, her latest serving, is an entertaining and juicy read. As much a revenge story as it is a personal drama, this novel is ultimately a love story - a story of gaining love for oneself. This is lucidly expressed using the ageless languages of food, lust and longing. Getting through a divorce after her husband's ugly affair with a beautiful colleague sends protagonist Clara into the depths of self-loathing and contempt. Through the lens of Clara…
It should be safe to say that it is impossible to complete a university degree in English Literature anywhere in the world and not come across the genius of the great American poet Emily Dickinson. Her fame soars well beyond university departments. For well over a century she has haunted reader's imaginations, lecture halls, anthologies, biographies and fictional adaptations with what came to be known as her reclusive nature and spasmodic gait. Hardly any reader coming in touch with her poetry would have been spared the elusive image of a middle-aged spinster in white, mourning an unknown lover and harbouring…
Sunday, 07 November 2010 02:00

Dark Matter

By
I chose to review this particular book - a detective novel that focuses on the relationship between two physicists who are both friends and professional rivals - believing it would provide a challenge: physics and modern German thrillers are terra incognito for me. I was also intrigued by accounts of the up-and-coming author, Juli Zeh, whose debut novel Eagles and Angels won critical acclaim and numerous prizes. I certainly found Dark Matter (titled In Free Fall in the US) an enlightening read. However, in the final analysis, I was not entertained, and I am not certain whether this is a…
Sunday, 07 November 2010 02:00

Why Teenagers Love Vampire Novels

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Why do teenagers love vampires? The global best seller lists are teeming with paranormal romance titles from Melissa de la Cruz's Blue Bloods and PC Cast's House of Night series to Maggie Stiefvater's werewolf love-fest Shiver. Speculative teen fiction is big business. Stephanie Meyer's Twilight saga has sold over 100 million copies globally and has been adapted into three equally record-breaking films, with two more on the way.  The love affair with vampires can be traced back to Hollywood. Joel Schumacher's 1987 film Lost Boys, starring Kiefer Sutherland as the bad boy vampire David, became a cult classic, reinventing the…
Sunday, 07 November 2010 02:00

Ghost? Yes.

By
J.R. Deo: "So?"Richard de Nooy: "So what?"Deo: "How are sales?"RdN: "No idea."Deo: "This is my fckn pension we're talking about." RdN: "As if you're going to live that long."Deo: "True. But I'd still like to know."RdN: "The publisher doesn't tell me these things."Deo: "Well fckn ask him then."RdN: "I'm not like you."Deo: "Aint that the truth."RdN: "I'll ask, okay?"Deo: "Still pissed off about that review?"RdN: "Kinda."Deo: "Who is this Henderson? Does he need fixing?"RdN: "Just leave it, okay?"Deo: "There are guys in here who make Charles Manson look like Mr. Bean with a beard. And they get released all the…
Monday night is quiz night down at the Irish pub. I always arrive early. I sort through the pile of newspapers that the bar keeps for customers. Some of the papers look fresh with no creases, and you can be sure they're today's. I scan the line of text under the banner: "Daily Mail", "De Morgen" or "Financial Times". European edition. Price : One pound sterling or Two euro fifty. Then the date: "Friday 3rd". Ditch it and try another. But even old papers are acceptable. Anything in English, from "home", will do.I choose a paper and sit down at…
Sunday, 07 November 2010 02:00

Four Drunk Beauties

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Alex Smith's third novel, Four Drunk Beauties, interweaves two stories - one of misery and survival, the other of plenty and adventure - and offers the reader a rollicking and intriguing experience. Dying in an infamous Iranian jail, two men - Drew, a spy, and Kamaal, a turncoat - share fantastic stories about four fabulous, larger than life women - the Beauties of the title. Theirs is a riveting tale inspired by the patterns and inscriptions of Persian carpets, an ancient prophecy and a well-guarded secret about the existence of a powerful army of soldiers on a centuries-old mission. The…
Sunday, 07 November 2010 02:00

Wall of Days

By
Assessing unpublished novels is a dubious task. When a manuscript arrives on your doorstep in a brown envelope they are rough diamonds at best, every reader's nightmare at worst. As a reviewer of raw texts you always hope for the former and never dare to expect more. Secretly though, you dream of that one gem of a story which will make up for all the other tedious reads. Almost a year ago I received the manuscript of a novel for assessment with an introductory statement comparing it to J.M. Coetzee's Waiting for the Barbarians. A tall order, I thought, sighing.…
  Describe your perfect day. My perfect day... Any day in which I'm able to clear my head of thoughts and be present, like not worrying about the future or being remorseful about the past. Clear blue sky, crisp air, waking up with my wife, both of us the right temperature and swooning from a decent spell of sleep, to a breakfast that tastes good and is the right size. Being in nature, a park perhaps, a quick jog, then falling into my first and second loves, the companions of my childhood that have come back into my life in…
  Describe your perfect day. Perfect is the moment that I accept that my imperfection is allowed to have its place. Those are guilt free days. Its always about the people around me - those who find ways to breach mistrust. What project or activity captures most of your energy and passion right now? Right now its largely the Right2Know Campaign - a civil society initiative which is campaigning to stop the South African Protection of Information Bill (the Secrecy Bill). Its a law designed by Securocrats who intend to make it easier to classify public information, making it difficult…
Tuesday, 29 June 2010 02:00

I regret to inform you...

By
Dear Mr. McSweeney,I regret to inform you that, although your internet tendency shows great promise and regularly prompts a wry smile, I have decided that your publication is unsuitable for my work. Because there are so many literary magazines to choose from, I am unable to enter into further correspondence regarding my decision, but sincerely hope this does not deter you from seeking the work of other authors. Sincerely yours, Richard de Nooy Dear Paris Review,  Although I am honoured by your request to contribute to your magazine, I regret to inform you that I must cordially decline as it…
Tuesday, 29 June 2010 02:00

Inner Space

By
In his book, A New Earth (2005), Eckhart Tolle likens 'inner space' to the depths of our own consciousness, in which there are many 'worlds' or 'dimensions'. However, moving between dimensions of inner space is actually only a metaphor for shifts taking place in our mind and consciousness, doorways opening into different experiences of reality. This could perhaps be better understood using the analogy of a computer program. As we enter the 'program', our mind is able to shift from one level to the next by our entering in key commands (intentions), each shift being accompanied by a corresponding change…
Tuesday, 29 June 2010 02:00

Baby Steps

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"The scariest thing for me, with both my daughters, was as soon as they've got their balance they want to run because - Independeeeeence! And at the same you're chasing after them because, at any point they miss a step and, oh my gracious!" Sheila is the mother of 12-year-old Chelsea, and 2-year-old Rebecca. "The thing when you're learning how to walk is you're made out of rubber. And I think it's also a bone thing, once you're up on your feet, and you want to go forward, you throw your head forward and your feet kind of follow, so…
Tuesday, 29 June 2010 02:00

The I on iPod

By
I used to think that the women in my family were witches. And our power usually was greater when we were together. Something like a team, or the X-Men. Can you picture it? My grandmother had this strong intuition and I always admired her for being so sensitive about people around her. She seemed to know everyone so well just by looking and paying attention to them all the time. I thought that was a really special gift. As I got older and tried to be like her, I discovered that my grandmother's powers weren't gifts from God or a…
Tuesday, 29 June 2010 02:00

Peace and Me

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I. Afterward I don't know what to write. Actually, I do. Fear. There, I wrote it. That's what this is all about - that four-letter word that dominates my life and sometimes really messes things up. I do know what to write. I saw it, I felt it, I wanted it. Peace. A five-letter word that describes an amazingly beautiful ideology with some very wonderful attributes. I use the word attributes carefully. Notice they can be applied by anyone to anything that describes it. I love Peace's attributes. Peace is...Or so I think. I find Peace so very appealing and…
Tuesday, 29 June 2010 02:00

Bless Me Father

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We all have stories to share but only a few of our stories are worth publishing as entire novels. I got the chance to speak to Cape Town based poet and writer, Mario d'Offizi about his book. He started writing his first novel shortly after a visit to the Congo in 2006 to document stories about South African soldiers serving as peacekeepers with the United Nations. Shortly after his return, he began to write about his experiences - these narratives rekindled memories, which he developed into the controversial novel, Bless Me Father. "The pastors and orphans I had encountered there…
Monday, 21 June 2010 02:00

Flashback Hotel

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Ivan Vladislavić's Flashback Hotel weaves together two, previously out of print, short story collections: Missing Persons (1989) and Propaganda by Monuments and Other Stories (1996). Both collections represent an earlier phase in Vladislavić's work, so anyone familiar only with his more recent writing is in for a treat. I had the pleasure of hearing Vladislavić read at the Cape Town launch of the book; each word considered, every sentence as perfect as you can get them. Flashback Hotel takes you on a visual journey through Hillbrow, telling the stories of everyday people and their everyday activities. Only it's not ordinary…
Monday, 21 June 2010 02:00

Solar

By
It is always a joy to open a new McEwan novel. I remember the wonderful shock of my first encounter with his work - The Cement Garden - and what a thrill it was to explore the more sinister, often subconscious, corners of the human mind through his characters. What McEwan captures more poignantly than any other writer I know is that moment of transition when good or innocent intentions turn into dire consequences. All the novels I have read by him either have a literal corpse or a more metaphorical one in the form of a dying or ruined…
Elleke Boehmer's first collection of stories - or "portraits" - best displays what it is about the short form that makes it such a fascinating genre: clarity of thought, precision of execution, and the pure joy in the practice of language.  Although best known as a novelist and a theoretical writer, Boehmer truly shines in her latest offering. Most pieces in the collection have been previously published in journals and anthologies, but here they come together, polished to form a scintillating whole. The portraits tell the stories of different characters, but are arranged in a quasi chronological order as if…
Counter Currents is a beautiful and ambitious book.  Cased in the garb of a coffee table, haute-design collector's item, Counter Currents, edited by Edgar Pieterse (director of the African Centre for Cities at the University of Cape Town) has a mission: to provide a compendium of possibilities for sustainable development in the Cape Town region. It asks: 'What changes the city? How do we imagine this change coming about?' The book is essentially an edited collection of academic and policy essays, punctuated with some visual content, and all wrapped up in the cloak of a sexy coffee table book. Its…
To be honest, The Short Second Life of Bree Tanner is the first of Stephenie Meyer books that I've read. Somehow, the Twilight hysteria has passed me by. In terms of this review, that's something of a pity, because this is clearly a spin-off of Eclipse (the third Twilight instalment), and the foreword notes that it was inspired by the author's curiosity about one of her characters, with whom Twilight fans will already be familiar. The character in question is, of course, Bree Tanner. Bree is a newborn vampire, and apparently lacks the magnetism and - dare I say it…
Tuesday, 16 February 2010 02:00

Bodyhood

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Bodyhood is Leon de Kock's third poetry collection (preceded by Bloodsong and gone to the edges). The volume is divided in four "Journals", each in its own way consisting of poems chronicling the everyday, the physicality of the body, confrontations with the elements, relationships and, for want of a better word, all kinds of fluidity. In fact, images of water, flow, motion dominate the collection. This is indicative of a certain uncertainty which manifests itself in other ways throughout the book, especially through repetition - as if the stability of the individual meaning of words was tested, to be either…
Tuesday, 16 February 2010 02:00

The Man from Beijing

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For years now, my friends reading Henning Mankell's work in German, Polish and English translation have been recommending his books to me. In spite of all this urging, for no particular reason I have never got around to reading any of his novels until recently. Unexpectedly, shortly before my departure for a trip to China Mankell's latest, The Man from Beijing, arrived on my desk for reviewing. With a title like that and the blurb promising to show the author "at the height of his powers", it seemed like the perfect travel companion for my journey and a great opportunity…
Monday, 15 February 2010 02:00

Q and A

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Zinaid Meeran's debut novel Saracen at the Gates, winner of the EU Literary Award, was published in 2009 by Jacana. It is "a revolutionary tale that is as raucously hilarious as it is poignant, with a satirical edge"; it is also a story a love affair and a coming-of-age, a political piss-take, a thesis in post-modern identity politics, a buzzing portrait of a crazy city, Johannesburg. Read an extract of Saracen at the Gates here. Zinaid agreed to field some questions from ITCH Editor, Mehita Iqani.  Mehita Iqani: How long did you work on the novel?Zinaid Meeran: I worked on…
New Writing from Africa 2009 presents the 34 finalists of the PEN/Studzinski Literary Award. 827 stories from all over Africa were entered for the short-story competition. They were first read by a team of preliminary readers which longlisted 195 titles. These went on to an editorial board consisting of Anthony Fleischer, Harry Garuba, Alistair King and Mary Watson, who in turn selected the finalists. Nobel Prize winner J.M. Coetzee chose the winning entries and honourable mentions. As one of the many preliminary readers, I had the pleasure of already reading some of the stories in this collection before the final…
Monday, 15 February 2010 02:00

Dear Olive

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Dear Olive, I'm angry! Angry at you! So I decided to write to you, because our relationship is not working. You are denying me access to your world... It is true, I must admit, that only a few months back I didn't know anything about you. But in the mean time, in the few articles about South African authors that I had read, you were never mentioned, how was I supposed to know? I came across your name in a very simple manner and from there started my quest to find the answers to your mysteries. Because, let's face it,…
Monday, 15 February 2010 02:00

Excursions

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  Outdoor movie theater across from Roberto Rossellini and Ingrid Bergman's house on Via Vittorio Emanuele, Stromboli, 2006 "At last I saw the figure of Hans as if enveloped in the huge halo of burning blaze, and no other sense remained to me but that sinister dread which the condemned victim may be supposed to feel when led to the mouth of a cannon, at the supreme moment when the shot is fired and his limbs are dispersed into empty space."  [1] The following thoughts, like limbs dispersed into space then reassembled, form a loose body - rudimentary, transformed, and…
Monday, 15 February 2010 02:00

May I Ask?

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  Architecture of Desegregation (how to get a wheelchair over sand)  May I ask, when we talk about racism and sexism and classism and colonialism what remains unsaid?In our classroom discussions of critical race and gender theory what is forgotten?What is rarely thought of in the first place?A lot, right?What do we never mention in our laundry lists of identity politicking? What ism do we rarely, if ever, think to include in the face of all that is abstractly whole and lovely and full of power?When we talk about, say, a wealthy western educated Christian heterosexual white man, along what…
Monday, 15 February 2010 02:00

Let the Right One In

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Despite what the cover blurb and the recent wave of publicity may tell you, John Lindqvist has not 'reinvented the vampire novel'. He's done one better – he's brought it back to its roots in raw, visceral horror. The story takes place in Blackeberg, a dingy suburb of Stockholm, and follows the lives of several loosely-related characters as they deal with social ills, addictions, depression, and the odd vampire attack. The central narrative revolves around Oskar, a twelve-year-old boy with a whole host of problems in his life: absentee father, clingy mother, vicious bullies at school. Things change when he…
Sunday, 13 September 2009 02:00

falling between the lines

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1. line all maps are imaginary…no maplines stand still…this story begins with a line containing the map of germany, a line defined in 1871...this was a line which expanded and contracted…it's a line which ebbed, flowed,  surged, shrank during the century of my grandmother's lifetime...a membrane cut in two, then reunified... this is a story about my grandmother, marie-luise wortmann ("mareile")...now that she has stopped moving, now, that her life-line has stopped, now it can be traced:a story of how she emerged from a land obsessed with lineage, a land possessed by the idea of territory, a restless line eager to…
Sunday, 13 September 2009 02:00

Ocean Mindedness

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The Rock of Gibralatar looks like a hazy distant cloud on the horizon behind me as the wind builds. I adjust the trim on the Genoa, check our course and turn off the engine. A silence, then a gentle creak as the wind fills the main sail and we heel over slightly. My cell phone signal goes from one bar to none. I turn it off. I remember an unanswered email and a forgotton goodbye and take note of the reality that there is nothing I can do about it now. A slight queasiness in my stomach... not seasickness, just nerves.…
Sunday, 13 September 2009 02:00

...

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My toes curl tighter into the crevice, hoping to wedge my suspended body more securely on the top of that monstrous rock. Slime and shouts from below threaten to push my shaky feet over the edge. Jump... just let go.A slow stare down and the minute picture of upturned eyeballs in the far-away water hits me. My precarious position slams into my stomach again, in realisation. Don't do it... are you crazy? Stop thinking. What are you doing? What are you waiting for? Jump...A second glance, down, down, down and my toes curl tighter and my stomach wrenches harder and…
Sunday, 13 September 2009 02:00

iCOPEo

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There is a road that runs from Ixopo into the hills. These hills are grass-covered and rolling, and they are lovely beyond any singing of it. Alan Paton's words penned in 1947 have sung through English classes taught by left-leaning matrons ever since. A small bakkie with a massive trailer maneuvered, kicking up dust and the odd unfortunate strelitzia, into the garden of an undistinguished, ramshackle yet pleasant bed and breakfast at the foot of one of these lovely hills. It was April 2009, days before South Africa's fourth democratic elections. The trailer carried two huge identical PVC posters advising…
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